Adventure Experience Tranquility And Breathtaking Views At Kakinohana Hija Spring

If you want to get away from it all and relax with tranquility all around you while being able to see breathtaking views of the Pacific Ocean, the Kakinohana Hija Spring in Nanjo is the perfect place to go for the morning or afternoon, alone or with guests.

Kakinohana Hiija Spring sign marker Kakinohana Hiija Spring trailhead

To access the spring, it is somewhat difficult to spot while driving to the location shown in the map below, even though there's a sign. That's because there's only a narrow entrance between a house and shrubbery leading to a wider stone road, which can throw you off.

Kakinohana Hiija Spring public restroom

It's a long drive there for many, so in the off chance that you happen to need to use the restroom before going down to the spring, or while you're there, the nice resident of the house to the left of the trail's entrance has a public restroom on the outside of their home.

Kakinohana Hiija Spring trail entrance Further down the trail to the Kakinohana Hiija Spring

While the stone road is quite stable, walking shoes to get down the approximately 150-meter path is highly recommended.

View of the spring from the bottom of the trail

Once you're at the bottom, you'll most likely notice the spring first. However, there is a sign placed with some history on the site.

History of Kakinohana Hiija

There were, and still are, two rivers, or smaller streams rather, that flowed into the spring. They segregated the usage of them: The men would use the right river while the women would use the left. The spring was located on the south side of the village, which made it very convenient for the villagers. People would come to do their laundry, wash vegetables, and even collect the water for different purposes at their homes. The water leaving the spring would then eventually be used for irrigation.

And then you'll notice a different sign, written in Japanese of course. These are the rules, so be respectful of them.

General rules for Kakinohana Hiija Spring

They are:
  1. Don't leave any of your garbage behind.
  2. Don't get into the farmer's fields seen on the way into the spring.
  3. Do not get in or play in the toi (or pool at the top of the hill where the water falls into behind the benches below).
Kakinohana Hiija toi Benches to rest on while at Kakinohana Hiija

While there are quite a few benches around the spring for us to rest on now, this wasn't always the case. There is a stone on the pathway down that women used to use as a resting point, as you'll see, while it's not a difficult hike, you might want to slow down and stop at some points yourself.

Stone to sit on to rest your feet in the spring Resting in the spring waters

Once you're at the spring itself, you can sit on this nice stone and soak your feet in the water.

Upper spring at Kakinohana Hiija

If the rock is in use, you can always go to the spring above too.


After a quick (or long) soak, you can still stick around on the bench nearest to the lower pond and listen to the water flow.

Ocean view from the spring

Or, you can turn around and take in a breathtaking view of the Pacific Ocean.

Our dog, Marron, being serenaded by a man playing his sanshin (guitar).

But don't forget to bring your dog along with you as it's pet-friendly! Just remember rule no. 1 above and take any droppings with you.

Stagnant water behind Kakinohana Hiija Spring

Behind the spring, or on the route of the easier foot accessible entrance to Kakinohana Hija is another pond with what appears to be stagnant water. So if you are a mosquito magnet, bug spray is advisable to pack along.
The views expressed on this page by users and staff are their own, not those of Okinawa.Org.

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David
David is the Founder of Okinawa.Org. When he's not busy with business and administrative dealings on the site, he's out looking for the smallest things in the largest areas that may be overlooked by many.

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