Articles by Elizabeth Gomez

You’ve gotten to Okinawa and so much is new, including many large and sometimes loud creatures. From giant, flying beasts to things that hide in the closet, here’s a little breakdown: I remember my first nights in Okinawa. Of course, my husband was immediately sent on deployment. So, young and alone, I slept in a tiny off-base, Okinawa-style apartment. In the middle of the night, a croaking noise brought me to a fully woken state. What was in the room with me, and where???? I fitfully spent...
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When we very first got to Okinawa, we were eager to try all the new foodstuffs. Many items looked strange and exciting. But we found one item that looked comfortable and familiar. Six doughnut holes topped with creamy icing and what looked like a garnish of chocolate. We popped one in and, "What in tarnation?" This was NOT a doughnut hole. While not horrible tasting, my mouth, expecting the sweetness of a dessert, wigged out at the octopus ball with a horseradish and soy sauce topping. Yes...
Obon recently passed and Halloween soon approaches. Likely you have heard some of Okinawa's ghost stories, but I've collected a few of my very favorite. If you dare, visit the sites of the stories and see if you get chills. Each time I pass one of these legendary places, my hackles raise and I am sure the tales originate in truth. One gate of Hansen always remains closed. No Japanese guard will stand watch at the barrier. It is said that every night at a certain hour, a man approaches the...
The sport called geocaching started in 2000 and mushroomed to cover the entire world. Players hide caches, which can be anything from a large box with small knick-knacks and a logbook to a tiny casing with a paper inside for signatures. On land, families often carry trinkets to switch out for the small toys in a larger treasure box, or they might bring a "travel bug." A travel bug can be transported from one cache to another and logged so that owners can see how the bug has traveled...
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